28 de noviembre de 2020
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Trump defies electoral system, launches accusations without evidence

Washington, Nov 5 (efe-epa).- United States President Donald Trump questioned Thursday the integrity of the country's electoral system, calling into question, without proof, the legality of millions of votes and opened the door to a long dispute over the outcome of the elections.

In his first appearance after the one he made during the election night, the president made a statement to the press full of falsehoods about the legitimacy of the process and did not offer any evidence about the accusations, mostly about corruption against officials of key states such as Michigan and Pennsylvania.

"It is a corrupt system and it makes people corrupt," he said in one of the most controversial statements made by a US president.

Trump did not provide evidence for his allegations that the elections are being rigged in favor of the "corrupt Democratic machine," adding that a "fraud" is being committed.

"They are trying to rig an election and we cannot let that happen. ... Our objective is to defend the integrity of the elections, so we will not allow the corrupt to rob us," he said.

The president again questioned the legality of mail-in ballots, insisting that votes received after Election Day but postmarked earlier should not be counted, in open defiance of Pennsylvania law.

The president predicted he will win reelection "easily," but said that "there will be a lot of litigation" in several key states, and that some of them could end in the US Supreme Court, with a conservative majority.

Trump also denounced an alleged "historical interference in the elections by the big media, big donors and big technology," but said that despite that the polls were wrong and there was no "blue wave" (Democrat).

"I have won the highest proportion of non-white voters of any Republican in 60 years," boasted the president, who highlighted in particular his margin among Latinos.

Immediately after concluding his press conference, large international media, such as The New York Times or The Guardian, did not hesitate to describe Trump's accusations against the system as false.

The Trump campaign has filed lawsuits to challenge scrutiny in Pennsylvania and other key states, Nevada, Michigan, and Georgia, although in the latter two territories the courts have dismissed their claims; while in Wisconsin, the president's team has called for a recount of the votes. EFE-EPA

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Contenido relacionado

Facebook shuts down "Stop the Steal" group

San Francisco, Nov 5 (efe-epa).- Facebook announced Thursday that it had shut down the "Stop the Steal" group, made up virtually exclusively of supporters of President Donald Trump and actively trying to cast doubt on the vote count in the wake of the Nov. 3 election, with the social media giant saying that the group had issued "worrying calls for violence."

The group, created on the evening of Nov. 3, was gaining new members at a very high rate at a time when the US is on tenterhooks because it is not known who will be the next president, although media outlets have put Democratic candidate Joe Biden ahead in the projected Electoral College vote by 264-214 over Trump.

"Stop the Steal" takes the same stance as the president, who is running for reelection and says that the vote count is being manipulated against him, despite the fact that there is no evidence of that, and is calling for "boots on the ground to protect the integrity of the vote," with pro-Trump people heading to polling places in Arizona and Michigan.

"In line with the exceptional measures that we are taking during this period of heightened tension, we have removed the Group 'Stop the Steal,' which was creating real-world events," Facebook said in a statement. "The group was organized around the delegitimization of the election process, and we saw worrying calls for violence from some members of the group."

The group had attracted more than 300,000 members on Facebook within the past two days and was being used to call for and organize protests claiming that Biden is attempting to "steal" the election.

One of the group's organizers, conservative activist Amy Kremer, complained on Twitter about Facebook's decision to shut down the group, saying that "The left is trying to steal an election and Social media is complicit. This is outrageous!"

Trump's reelection campaign has launched a legal offensive to stop Biden's forward motion, given that the Democrat is on the verge of winning the White House after top US media outlets reported and projected that he had won the popular vote in several key states, in addition to the traditionally "blue" (Democratic) states he had been expected to win.

The president's campaign has filed a number of lawsuits to challenge the electoral process in various states, the ongoing vote count and other issues with an eye toward short-circuiting Biden's anticipated win in the Electoral College, where 270 votes are needed to win the presidency and the former vice president at present has been deemed to have won 264 and Trump 214.

Biden is also ahead at this point by about 3.5 million votes in the nationwide popular vote count and appears to have garnered the most votes of any presidential candidate in history.

Trump on Thursday took to Twitter to demand that the vote count be stopped in certain states, while Biden demanded just the opposite: that all valid ballots be counted.

The two men posted their divergent messages on Twitter as all eyes are on the vote counts in Nevada, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Georgia and Arizona, in the latter of which certain media outlets have already projected a Biden victory, although Trump appears to be narrowing the former vice president's lead as the vote count proceeds.

Resorting to all capital letters in two consecutive Twitter messages, Trump wrote: "STOP THE COUNT!" and "ANY VOTE THAT CAME IN AFTER ELECTION DAY WILL NOT BE COUNTED!"

When asked about the significance of that assertion, the president's campaign spokesman, Jason Miller, told reporters that Trump does not want the counting of ballots that arrived by mail to continue, although some 65 million Americans - including Trump himself - voted by mail during this election cycle to avoid Election Day crowds and waiting in line at the polling places amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Trump has positioned himself against counting mail-in ballots because the data show that Democrats used that method to a greater extent than Republicans, with most GOP supporters preferring to wait to cast their ballots last Tuesday on Election Day.

Meanwhile, Biden wrote on Twitter that "Every vote must be counted," accompanying this message with a video urging that all votes be counted and in which a white woman and a black man are featured.

In another tweet, Biden wrote: "Donald Trump does not decide the outcome of this election and nor do I. The American people decide. That's why we've launched the Biden Fight Fund - to ensure every vote is counted."

EFE

Trump campaign files election lawsuits

Washington, Nov 5 (efe-epa).- President Donald Trump's reelection campaign has launched a legal offensive to stop the forward motion of his rival, Democrat Joe Biden, who is on the verge of winning the White House after top US media outlets reported and projected that he had won the popular vote in several key states, in addition to the traditionally "blue" (Democratic) states he had been expected to win.

These are the lawsuits that the president's campaign so far has filed to challenge the electoral process, the ongoing vote count and other issues - all apparently, although Democrats would say quite obviously, with an eye toward short-circuiting Biden's anticipated win in the Electoral College, where 270 votes are needed to win the presidency and the former vice president at present has been deemed to have won 264 and Trump 214.

Biden is also ahead at this point by about 3.5 million votes in the nationwide popular vote count and appears to have garnered the most votes of any presidential candidate in history.

NEVADA - ALLEGED GHOST VOTES

Without providing any evidence for the claim, the Trump team has said that there was election fraud in the key state of Nevada because some 10,000 people who do not live there were allowed to submit ballots and, in addition, the votes of deceased citizens were counted - presumably for Biden.

In this and other cases, the campaign's allegations appear to be based on misinformation or outright hoaxes. For example, election authorities in each state frequently and regularly review the voter lists to eliminate names of people who have died, and thus there is no evidence that this type of situation is a generalized problem.

Nevada courts still have not ruled on the matter. All the lawsuits that Trump has filed ultimately could wind up in the hands of the US Supreme Court, where conservatives hold a 6-3 majority and three of the justices were nominated to the lifetime seats on the high court by the president.

LAWSUIT AGAINST GEORGIA'S DEMOCRATIC REDOUBT

The Trump campaign has decided to file a lawsuit in Chatham County, where the city of Savannah is located and which has strong Democratic voting tendencies and therefore is inclined to provide Biden with a fair number of votes.

However, again without providing any evidence, the campaign claimed that in that county a Republican election observer saw 53 ballots added late to a stack of mail-in votes that arrived in time to be counted. To be valid, ballots in Georgia must arrive at election headquarters before 7 pm on Election Day, which was last Tuesday, Nov. 3.

A judge in Georgia on Thursday threw out the lawsuit due to a lack of evidence provided by the plaintiff.

"RUMORS" IN MICHIGAN

Trump's team alleged that the Michigan secretary of state, Democrat Jocelyn Benson, the state's top election official, was allowing ballots to be counted that had been deposited in advance without the supervision of election observers from both main parties.

Thus, they asked for the vote count to be halted and for those ballots that Republican observers allegedly had not had access to to be reviewed.

A local judge on Thursday rejected that request saying that it was based on "rumors" and, in addition, noting that the vote count has practically come to a conclusion in Michigan, and thus the lawsuit was filed too late.

MORE ACCESS IN PENNSYLVANIA

The president's campaign filed suit demanding that Republican observers be allowed to more closely view - that is, from less than 6 feet away - any vote counting activity, so that they might better monitor the process.

The Pennsylvania court ruled on Thursday in favor of Trump but its decision has a limited impact, since it does not halt or delay the count or invalidate any portion of the count made so far in this swing state.

RESORTING TO THE SUPREME COURT

Meanwhile, the Trump campaign on Wednesday asked the US Supreme Court to allow it to join a lawsuit already filed by the Pennsylvania Republican Party.

Pennsylvania Republicans had asked the country's top judicial body to invalidate the ruling of the state's high court that allowed mail-in ballots arriving as late as this Friday to be counted, provided that they bear a postmark not later than Nov. 3.

EFE

Trump calls for halt to vote count, Biden for full count

Washington, Nov 5 (efe-epa).- President Donald Trump on Thursday took to Twitter to demand that the vote count be stopped in certain states, while his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, demanded just the opposite: that all valid ballots be counted.

The two men posted their divergent messages on Twitter as all eyes are on the vote counts in Nevada, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Georgia and Arizona, in the latter of which certain media outlets have already projected a Biden victory, although Trump appears to be narrowing the former vice president's lead as the vote count proceeds.

Resorting to all capital letters in two consecutive Twitter messages, Trump wrote: "STOP THE COUNT!" and "ANY VOTE THAT CAME IN AFTER ELECTION DAY WILL NOT BE COUNTED!"

When asked about the significance of that assertion, the president's campaign spokesman, Jason Miller, told reporters that Trump does not want the counting of ballots that arrived by mail to continue, although some 65 million Americans - including Trump himself - voted by mail during this election cycle to avoid Election Day crowds and waiting in line at the polling places amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Trump has positioned himself against counting mail-in ballots because the data show that Democrats used that method to a greater extent than Republicans, with most GOP supporters preferring to wait to cast their ballots last Tuesday on Election Day.

Meanwhile, Biden wrote on Twitter that "Every vote must be counted," accompanying this message with a video urging that all votes be counted and in which a white woman and a black man are featured.

In another tweet, Biden wrote: "Donald Trump does not decide the outcome of this election and nor do I. The American people decide. That's why we've launched the Biden Fight Fund - to ensure every vote is counted."

And in a third message on Twitter, he added: "Be patient, folks. Votes are being counted, and we feel good about where we are," thus expressing confidence, as he did in remarks delivered late on Wednesday, in his chances to win the presidency but stopping short of claiming victory.

A Biden campaign official told EFE that the former vice president, who served in that post for eight years under former President Barack Obama (2009-2017), will probably address the American people again although no time for those remarks was specified.

At present, Biden has been credited with 264 electoral votes by major US media outlets, including the state of Arizona, with its 11 electoral votes, while Trump has 214.

A total of 270 votes in the Electoral College are required to win the presidency, regardless of the popular vote total, although Biden is ahead of Trump by some 3.5 million votes in that category.

The most populous county in Arizona, Maricopa, is not scheduled to provide new voting totals until 7 pm on Thursday.

Nevada announced on Thursday that it will take it until at least the weekend to count 63,000 mail-in ballots that have not yet been tabulated, and state election authorities will continue to accept ballots that arrive up until next Tuesday, although they must be postmarked on or before Nov. 3.

In that western state on Thursday morning, the Trump campaign filed a complaint claiming that some 10,000 voters not living in Nevada had voted, although at a press conference, Clark County vote registrar Joe Gloria said that no irregularities had occurred.

The Nevada complaint, however, is part of the legal strategy launched by Trump and his campaign team shortly after the vote count began and comes on the heels of assorted other complaints presented in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Georgia.

Meanwhile, Trump and his team on Thursday won the first of the lawsuits they had filed to challenge the scrutiny of ballots in several key states, with a Pennsylvania court ruling that it would allow his team's observers to supervise the vote count in that key state more closely, although it does not halt the count or invalidate any portion of the tally made there to date.

The court order allows Trump campaign observers to stand less than six feet from any table at which votes are being counted by election workers to enable them to better monitor the process.

In Pennsylvania, Trump currently leads Biden by more than 120,000 votes with 92 percent of the ballots counted, but early on Thursday there were more than 700,000 ballots that had not yet been counted and it is expected that most of those votes will go to the Democratic candidate.

EFE

Trump confident he'll win Arizona, despite early media projections

By Alex Segura Lozano

Phoenix, Nov 5 (efe-epa).- With almost half a million ballots remaining to be counted in Arizona, President Donald Trump says he is confident that he will beat out Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, whom media outlets like the Associated Press and Fox News already on Election Night projected to be the winner there.

But the electoral suspense film isn't over yet, and Arizona - an impregnable conservative stronghold since 1996, when progressive President Bill Clinton won the state in his reelection bid - could "flip" to the Democrats in the coming hours.

The task is difficult but not impossible: Trump must receive a little more than 57 percent of the as-yet-uncounted votes statewide. So hope is still alive in the White House.

Maricopa County has been trending on Twitter in a number of countries, including in the US and Spain. The reason that the county, the capital of which is Phoenix, is on everyone's lips is that some 275,000 votes cast there still remain to be counted, according to the latest update from local authorities.

The result of the vote count will be made public at 7 pm on Thursday - either a full count or a partial count, depending on what election workers can accomplish by that time.

That is, if Trump supporters will leave the election workers alone to do their jobs.

On Wednesday, hundreds of Trump supporters protested in front of the county offices - where the vote count is under way - claiming that election officials were "stealing" their votes and shouting "Count my vote!"

Just the opposite happened with a group of Trump supporters in Michigan, who demanded that the vote count be stopped there, and even Trump himself on Thursday tweeted that election workers need to stop counting the ballots.

The reality is that Maricopa County is the county with the fourth-largest percentage of Hispanics in the US. The Pew Research Center calculates that about 1.4 million Latinos live there.

Over the past few hours, Trump has cut Biden's lead in Arizona as the vote count has proceeded. With 85 percent of the ballots tabulated, the president has 1,400,951 votes to Biden's 1,469,341.

The difference is so narrow that many media outlets have not dared to project who will win that key state.

Its 11 electoral votes could be crucial, as the country waits to see what happens in other states like Pennsylvania and Georgia, where the vote count also is still under way. A candidate needs 270 electoral votes to win the White House, regardless of what the nationwide popular vote totals are, and currently Biden has 264 (if Arizona is counted in his column) and Trump 214.

Despite being relatively close in the Arizona vote tally, Trump would need to obtain about 60 percent of the 470,000 votes that remain to be counted, according to The Arizona Republic, and that will be difficult but not impossible.

However, besides the votes in Maricopa County, other traditionally very blue (Democratic) counties remain to be fully counted, namely Pima, Coconino and Santa Cruz.

But as if this weren't enough, the vote count story has more chapters. One of them tells the ongoing story of the lawsuits that assorted voters are beginning to file alleging that their votes have not been counted because they had filled in the little bubble by their candidate's name with a Sharpie pen, rather than with a ballpoint.

Election authorities, however, say that using a Sharpie is completely legal, but certain images and videos that are circulating through the social networks show that allegedly some of those votes were deemed to be null and void by some precincts.

The suspense will last up until the validation - or invalidation - of a number of votes that, because of the narrow difference in the popular vote totals between Biden and Trump, could be crucial in determining the winner.

Although Trump is demanding that vote counting be halted, if he is ahead, but continue if he is behind, Biden, meanwhile, is saying that every valid vote must be properly counted.

EFE

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